Web developer. More than a one–trick pony. Less than Jack of all trades.

  1. Over the past year or so, I've been noticing some outstanding examples of what I've come to call a “long-form page”. It's a content type unique to the web, and the best definition I can give it is:

    A long, elaborate treatment of a dedicated subject with a lot of art direction to carry it well.

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  2. When approaching a website optimization task, I usually brainstorm a range of SEO, CRO, and usability tactics which would create a force multiplier effect and take the site's ROI to a significantly higher level.

    Often, though, I see that a site fails to implement the most fundamental method underlying all optimization: creating explicit resources out of the site's topics of interest. Let me explain.

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  3. When creating a site for the first time, business owners are often constrained in resources and don't give much consideration to its business objectives or how well it will support their publishing workflow. The site gets done, deployed, and used on a budget, but in the longer term it often gets counter–productive to the business, causing it to lose visitors and customers. While every website (and business) is unique, there's a handful of critical points to be aware of for a good start.

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  4. When you say "SEO", what do you really mean? There is a discipline of making web pages search engine friendly, with the goal of being findable by people. I'd like to explore what we call this discipline. Three characters emerge: The Good, The Bad, & The Weird. We'll start at the middle.

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  5. In this post, I re–visit Literate Code, my earlier experiment with creating an optimal layout for technichal and programming essays. The challenge gets more interesting when one considers responsiveness; you want your technical article to look its best on desktop, tablet, and smartphone screens.

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